Furness abbey, Lancashire
Read Online
Share

Furness abbey, Lancashire by Department of the Environment

  • 53 Want to read
  • ·
  • 72 Currently reading

Published by H.M.S.O in London .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Folding plan inside back cover.

Statement(by) J.C. Dickinson.
ContributionsDickinson, J. C
The Physical Object
Pagination23 p. :
Number of Pages23
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19669132M

Download Furness abbey, Lancashire

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

T HE Abbey of St. Mary in Furness was founded in by the monks of Savigny in Normandy in consequence of a gift made by Stephen, Count of Boulogne and Mortain, later King of England. The gift is on a munificent scale.   The Coucher Book of Furness Abbey Item Preview remove-circle Book digitized by Google and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb. Notes. Vol. 1, printed from the original preserved in the Record office, London, edited by Rev. J. C. Atkinson; v. 2, printed from the original manuscript in the British museum, edited by John Brownbill Pages: Diplomatics Complete Names Complete Cartulary Number: Title: The Coucher Book of Furness Abbey Volume: Part 3 Bibliographic Title: The Coucher Book of Furness Abbey. Rev. J. C. Atkinson, John Brownbill. Chetham Society. V Chetham Society. the abbey of furness The abbey of Furness was founded in the year by Stephen, then count of Boulogne and Mortain and lord of Lancaster. (fn. 1) Three years earlier Stephen had granted to the abbot of Savigny in his county of Mortain the vill of Tulketh in Amounderness; and it was from this place that the Savigniac monks retired to the deep vale of Bekanesgill.

  Book digitized by Google from the library of the University of Michigan and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb. Notes Vol. 1, printed from the original preserved in the Record office, London, edited by Rev. J. C. Atkinson; v. 2, printed from the original manuscript in the British museum, edited by John Brownbill; v. Furness Abbey was founded by Stephen, Count of Boulogne and Mortain (later King of England, ), first at Tulketh, near Preston, in Lancashire (,) and, in , in the Vale of Beckansgill, a mile south of the 'vill' of Dalton. It was the first Savigniac monastery to be founded in England. While excavating the grave of a prosperous medieval abbot, a hoard of medieval treasures was discovered at Furness Abbey. This discovery unearthed the first crozier (a staff with a crook on top) to be excavated in Britain in over 50 years and an impressive gemstone ring was also on: Manor Road, Barrow in Furness, LA13 0PJ, Cumbria.   Furness Abbey is a well known Lancashire monastery, but now sits within the modern county of Cumbria. Located in the evocatively named Vale of Nightshade, it is one of the most substantial abbey ruins in the whole of Britain. Monks from the Savignaic order were invited from France to set up an abbey in England.

So who built Furness Abbey and what happened to them?. In , the Count of Boulogne and Mortain, Stephen, grandson of William the Conqueror and King of England from to , invited twelve grey-robed Savigniac monks to set up base at Bulket (Tulketh), near Preston, in Lancashire. The Savigniac order was founded at Savigny on the border of Normandy and Maine in , and Tulketh was the. Furness Abbey was the second richest abbey in England. The extensive ruins are in the care of English Heritage. Well-worth a visit. The Coucher Book of Furness Abbey Paperback – Janu by Furness Abbey (Author) out of 5 stars 1 rating. See all 16 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Hardcover "Please retry" $ Reviews: 1. The following description of Furness Abbey is based by permission upon the work of Mr. W. H. St. John Hope, The Abbey of St. Mary in Furness. A description and plan are given in West, Furness, showing its state about See also Cumb. and Westmld. Antiq. Soc. vi, (masons' marks), xvi, –